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Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin: There was a time when human

rights were subsumed to Cold War loyalty. If it wasn't already

clear, the Arab uprisings are a sign that those days are finished.

 

 

Vedomosti, Russia

Muslim Uprisings Spell End of 'Our Sons of Bitches'

 

"The dissatisfied, it turned out, can organize very quickly; and secular authoritarian regimes, it seems, have nothing to answer them with. For the West and Russia, the conclusion is that 'our sons of bitches' have lost their last competitive advantage - predictability. Betting on such regimes has become too risky."

 

EDITORIAL

 

Translated By Yekaterina Blinova

 

February 22, 2011

 

Russia - Vedomosti - Original Article (Russian)

Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza, one of America's 'sons of bitches': The Arab revolutions erupting in the Middle East and North Africa may be a death knell for a policy that was regarded by Americans as a necessary evil during the era of the Cold War.  

 

AL-JAZEERA NEWS VIDEO: Pax Americana - The U.S. taken by surprise, Feb. 27, 00:05:08RealVideo

The parade of revolutions in the Middle East must change global diplomacy and, in any case, bury the concept of our son of a bitch.

 

The idiom, credited to Franklin D. Roosevelt and uttered in reference to either the Nicaraguan Anastasio Somoza or Dominican Rafael Trujillo, from then on described quite precisely the principles of superpower relations with third world countries during the Cold War. Dictatorial or merely authoritarian regimes could be supported, their political loyalty paid for, and perhaps along the way their natural resources or geopolitical gifts as well. But when the Cold War ended, the relevance of the term was diminished. But still there remained reasons for the West - and even Russia - to close their eyes to the undemocratic preferences of leaders in the countries they partnered with.

Posted by WORLDMEETS.US

 

In the case of the Middle East, for example, it was thought that secular authoritarian regimes were more reliable in terms of relations with Israel and the struggle against al-Qaeda. Tunisia and Egypt were considered very stable, and Egypt was the cornerstone of the Middle East peace process, however endless it may seem. In 2003, Libya agreed to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and agreed to pay compensation to the victims of the [Lockerbie] terrorist attack in exchange for the lifting of U.N. sanctions and guarantees to the regime. Thanks to the sales of oil and gas to the West, Libya was quite economically prosperous and quietly purchased Russian arms. And yet it turned out that even Jamahiriya was unstable.

 

[Editor's Note: Jamahiriya is an euphemism for Libya that was popularized by its embattled dictator, Muammar Qaddafi].

 

The fire in the Middle East has a variety of causes. Each country has its own economic and social contradictions, but the role of Islamism grows everywhere. There seems to be a chain reaction at work. It turns out that everywhere one looks, there are those who are dissatisfied with various manifestations of injustice - and with the fact that the disgruntled have no legal opportunity to express their complaints and demand that they be taken into account. The dissatisfied, it turned out, can organize very quickly; and secular authoritarian regimes, it seems, have nothing to answer them with.

 

For the West and Russia, the conclusion is that our sons of bitches have lost their last competitive advantage - predictability. Betting on such regimes has become too risky - and this cannot but be taken into account by the practical world of diplomats.

 

 

SEE ALSO ON THIS:

News, Switzerland: Twittering 'Sweet Lies': Corporate Co-opting of Social Media
Dar Al-Hayat, Saudi Arabia: Arabs Pay Homage to Facebook and Twitter!
Dar Al-Hayat, Saudi Arabia: Today's Muslim Unrest is 'No Passing Cloud'
Kayhan, Iran: America's Doomed Campaign to Help 'Puppets and Traitors'

Global Times, China: It's Time for China to Exert More Influence on Mideast

DNA, France: An Unhesitant Salute to Egypt's Uncertain Triumph of Liberty

FAZ, Germany: Explaining the West's Hesitation on Egypt
Kayhan, Iran: Ahmadinejad: Egypt Revolution Reveals Hand of the 'Mahdi'

Jerusalem Post, Israel: Sharansky: 'Maybe it's Time to Put Our Trust in Freedom'

Le Quotidian d'Oran, Algeria: SHAME ON YOU, MR. OBAMA!

Gazeta Wyborcza, Poland: America's Egyptian Problem: Ethics or Realpolitik?

Amal al-Oumma, Egypt: What We Egyptians Have Learned from Revolution

O Globo, Brazil: Facebook and Twitter are Just a Means to a Greater End

La Jornada, Mexico: In Egypt, Washington's Global Image is Once Again at Stake

Al-Wahdawi, Yemen: In Egypt, the 'Mother of All Battles' is Still to Come

Al-Seyassah, Kuwait: U.S. Pressure on Democracy is at Root of the Problem

Tehran Times, Iran: Egyptians and All Arabs Must Beware of 'Global Ruling Class'

Le Quotidien dOran, Algeria: Mubarak, Friends Scheme to Short-Circuit Revolt

Salzburger Nachrichten, Austria: U.S. Must Act or Cede Egypt to the Islamists

Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Germany: America's' 'Shameful' Faustian Bargain Unravels

Guardian Unlimited, U.K.: Mubarak Regime 'Still Very Much in Power'

Hankyoreh, South Korea: Egypt: Will U.S. Pick the Right Side this Time?

Global Times, China: Egypt, Tunisia Raise Doubts About Western Democracy

Kayhan, Iran: Middle East Revolutions Herald America's Demise

Sydney Morning Herald: Revolution is in the Air, But U.S. Sticks to Same Old Script

The Telegraph, U.K.: America's Secret Backing for Egypt's Rebel Leaders

Debka File, Israel: Sources: Egypt Uprising Planned in Washington Under Bush

 

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[Posted by WORLDMEETS.US February 28, 12:56am]

 







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