U.S. citizens express their discontent with illegal immigrants:

Is the gravy train of benefits that encourage anti-immigrant

sentiment finally reaching the end of the line?

 

 

Illegal Immigration: Cruelty, Xenophobia and U.S. Business (La Jornada, Mexico)

 

"The criminalization of undocumented migration in the United States and the violations of human rights that accompany it, is a strategy that results in enormous political, economic and corporate profit, the very existence of which contradicts the founding principles of that country."

 

EDITORIAL

 

Translated By Halszka Czarnocka

 

April 4, 2013

 

Mexico La Jornada Original Article (Spanish)

Julia Ojeda, left, comforts her daughter, at a march against deportation, family separation, and workplace raids in Phoenix, AZ. Ojeda's husband is in custody after being arrested in a workplace raid.

BBC NEWS VIDEO, U.K.: Immigration issue brings mixed feelings toward Obama, Nov. 5, 2012, 00:03:05RealVideo

According to official reports divulged by The New York Times, some 300 undocumented migrants a day are subject to solitary confinement in U.S. prisons on orders of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE for short). This happens in spite of the fact that such people have not been jailed for criminal offences, but for civil ones, which under the laws of our neighboring country, don't even merit punishment. Their detentions are a means of ensuring that they appear at administrative hearings. Out of this figure, half, or some 150, are kept in solitary confinement for 75 days or more, which according to psychiatric experts cited by the newspaper, multiplies the risk of severe mental damage for the detainees.

 

Beyond the intrinsic cruelty of laws currently in force in our neighboring country under which migrants are persecuted - laws that criminalize foreigners for coming to the U.S. in search of work or a better life than what their countries of origin offer - inhumane practices like this one have various contextual elements that must be examined.

Posted By Worldmeets.US

 

The first is the structural hypocrisy of prosecuting undocumented aliens even as they constitute an indispensable element in the functioning of the U.S. economy. In particular, they add to its competitiveness through the very low wages they receive. They, in turn, are used by agriculture, industry and services as a valve limiting pressure on salaries from U.S. workers.

 

Another is the paranoid and xenophobic and discourse that has sustained social backing for anti-migrant legal measures that for decades has been regularly fanned by politicians and political candidates, particularly but not exclusively those of the Republican Party. But that is beginning to change thanks to the rise of the Latin American electorate and its growing clout in shaping the superpower's political map. Indeed, in the last presidential election, the so-called Hispanic vote was critical to Barack Obama's re-election.

 

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SEE ALSO ON THIS:
El Universal, Mexico: Influence-Flush U.S. Latinos Must 'Exploit Unprecedented Moment'
La Jornada, Mexico: Pirates, Puritans and U.S. Immigration
La Jornada, Mexico: Clueless Border Patrol Uses Intelligence to Study Recidivism
La Jornada, Mexico: Undocumented on Edge Before U.S. Supreme Court Ruling
La Jornada, Mexico: Undocumented are Again Caught in U.S. Power Struggle
Excelsior, Mexico: 'Comprehensive' Mexico-U.S. Integration is the Only Answer
La Jornada, Mexico: NAFTA Should Be Reopened to Protect Mexican Workers
La Jornada, Mexico: Mexicans in the U.S.: A Nation Within a Nation
El Universal, Mexico: Lawmakers Condemn Arizona's 'Racist' Anti-Immigrant Law
Diario Co Latino, El Salvador: Europe and U.S. Equally Cruel to Migrant Workers
El Periodico, Guatemala: Obama is Right: U.S. People Need Spanish Lessons!
El País, Spain: Tea Party 'Endangers Health' of American Democracy
El Universal, Mexico: U.S. Conservatives See Writing On Wall: Immigration Reform is Coming
Le Monde, France: U.S. Immigration Plans Set Example French Politicians Should Heed

 

 

A third element that cannot be overlooked is the lucrative business that gives rise to these persecutory legal measures against migrants. It is well known that every year, U.S. authorities apprehend some 400,000 migrants of various nationalities and detain in private prisons - mainly those operated by Corrections Corporation of America, The Geo Group and the Management and Training Corp. The companies charge federal institutions a fixed fee for each detainee ($122 per day in the case of the GEO Group) and, according to human rights organizations, stage a permanent federal and state legislative lobbying effort to ensure that undocumented immigration remains criminalized. Significantly, in the last decade, profits at these businesses rose on average 100 percent, and according to the humanitarian group Immigrants for Sale, their combined annual revenues reached $5 billion.

 

As you can see, the criminalization of undocumented migration in the United States and the violations of human rights that accompany it, is a strategy that results in enormous political, economic and corporate profit, the very existence of which contradicts the founding principles of that country. While the volume of this business makes resistance to immigration reform easier to understand, such reform is socially and ethically imperative.

 

CLICK HERE FOR SPANISH VERSION

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Posted By Worldmeets.US Apr. 4, 2013, 10:09am