No news is bad news: Osama bin Laden is still at large.

 

 

The Daily Jang, Pakistan

Why bin Laden Hasn't Been Found

 

"Looking for Osama bin Laden by relying on modern technology is like fishing without a hook. There is a $50 million reward on offer for him and so far there has been nothing but silence. We expect no change in the foreseeable future."

 

EDITORIAL

 

December 8, 2009

 

Pakistan - The Daily Jang - Original Article (English)

The longer bin Laden evades capture, the more his legend grows: A box of Pakistan-made 'Super Osama bin Laden Kulfa Balls.' The milk and coconut-flavored candies were purchased at a bazaar in Kandahar city, Afghantistan in June.

 

BBC NEWSNIGHT VIDEO: Is Pakistan doing enough to tackle al-Qaeda and capture Osama bin Laden?, Dec. 4, 00:03:57RealVideo

The failure of our forces and agencies to capture or locate any of the Taliban senior leadership in Swat or Waziristan may show a lack of capacity or competence, but this pales in comparison to the failure of all concerned to find Osama bin Laden. We may never know what part we've played in the hunt for the man, but we can be sure that the United States has deployed every resource at its disposal to find him - and has failed. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said on Sunday that U.S. intelligence didn't know where the al-Qaeda leader is and that for years has had no reliable information on his whereabouts. The U.S. has sophisticated surveillance systems both on and off the planet that stream live video - systems that can identify faces and read license plate numbers from satellites in geostationary orbit. It also has systems aboard long-loitering drones that fly day and night and systems that can read encrypted e-mails and pluck phone calls from the ether. But suppose these systems are the wrong tools for the targets they seek?

 

From the outset, what the United States has lacked in its hunt is that most vital of intelligence assets - "humint." Human intelligence is based on networks of informers that reveal what's going on inside a targeted organization or group. They are often paid for their work and run the risk of discovery - with death a likely outcome if they are exposed.

Posted by WORLDMEETS.US

 

This lack of human intelligence is perhaps unsurprising, considering the milieu within which bin Laden exists. He lives in a word-of-mouth culture where messages are passed by people who have memorized them - and there has yet to be a surveillance system invented that can read minds. He exists within a social context that, if it so desires, is largely impermeable to external probing, and is protected by a code of honor that is hard-wired into the minds of those who shelter him. He and those around him don't use mobile phones, so it is rumored, nor do they use the Internet. And the most recent report is that he spends more time in Afghanistan than he does Pakistan because of the need to avoid the prying eyes of drones that might spot him if he's out in the open.

 

Looking for Osama bin Laden by relying on modern technology is like fishing without a hook - it's unlikely to succeed. There is a $50 million reward on offer for him and so far there has been nothing but silence. We expect no change in the foreseeable future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by WORLDMEETS.US, Dec. 7, 7:18pm

 







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