http://worldmeets.us/images/franklin-roosevelt-fireside-chat_pic.jpg

 

 

The Enduring Significance of FDR's Broad Theory of Freedom (Diario Economic, Portugal)

 

"In addition to being associated with decisive events in the history of the United States and the world (from the New Deal to the creation of the United Nations), President Roosevelt was also the one who, in the most impressive manner, expressed the notion that freedom isn't just about personal, civil and political liberty against the state, however crucial these may be. Rather, it also includes the freedom against economic and social constraints that suppress the enjoyment of those previously mentioned freedoms. As Roosevelt said, 'necessitous men are not free men,' or in other words, 'those who suffer from deprivation are not free.' These are vital matters that apply to all."

 

By Vital Moreira

http://worldmeets.us/images/vital-moreira_mug.jpg

 

Translated By Ricardo Farinha

 

October 13, 2014

 

Portugal - Diario Economico - Original Article (Portuguese)

Participating in the recent (and excellent) conference of Francisco Manuel dos Santos Foundation for Freedom [right column, first video], it occurred to me to invoke Roosevelt to counter the current neoliberal drift that wants to reduce the notion of freedom "negative freedom," i.e., to individual autonomy against the authorities, denying the role of social rights as a factor in the enjoyment of those freedoms by all.

 

In fact, in addition to being associated with decisive events in the history of the U.S. and the world (from the New Deal to the creation of the United Nations), President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was also the one who, in the most impressive manner, expressed the notion that freedom isn't just about personal, civil and political liberty against the state, however crucial these may be. Rather, it also includes the freedom against economic and social constraints that suppress the enjoyment of those previously mentioned freedoms.

Posted By Worldmeets.US

 

As early as 1941, Roosevelt addressed Congress in what came to be known as the discourse on the "four freedoms," which remains a landmark in the history of the theory of freedom in the United States [video in right column, top]. Paired with the freedom of speech and the freedom of worship came, unexpectedly, the "freedom from want" and the "freedom from fear." What is important to note is that only the first two were part of the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution. The other two freedoms were a radical change in American political discourse.

 

http://worldmeets.us/images/FDR-Memorial-wall-freedoms_pic.jpg

The four freedoms: uniting individual rights and the collective rights

that make individual liberty possible.

 

Three years later, in 1944, with the war dragging on, Roosevelt delivered another speech [right column, third video] in which he returned to the theme of a broad notion of freedom, with a new set of rights that Europe would call "social rights," among which are the right to employment, education, health, housing, etc. Rightly known as the "Second Bill of Rights," this no less remarkable speech by the president of the United States would have a decisive influence on the formulation of the "positive" rights laid out in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in which incidentally, his widow Eleanor Roosevelt played a major role, and whose preamble explicitly invokes the four freedoms of 1941.

 

When, after enduring an "apartheid" caused by the Cold War between rights of liberty and social rights, neo-liberalism insisted on favoring the former and denying the latter (along with the notion of welfare state). It is important to recall the Rooseveltian conception that includes both in the theory of freedom. Nearly 70 years after Roosevelt's death - to be celebrated next year, his broad notion of freedom is not only about the autonomy of the individual, but a condition for the realization of human achievement, and is as important today as it was when it was formulated.

 

As Roosevelt said, "necessitous men are not free men," or in other words, "those who suffer from deprivation are not free." These are vital matters that apply to all.

 

SEE ALSO ON THIS:

Die Welt, Germany: The World Needs an America that 'Hunts Down Monsters'

Corriere Della Sera, Italy: 'Obama Prototype': Rome's First Black Emperor, Septimius Severus

FTD, Germany: 'Cult of the Founding Fathers' is Obscuring America's Worldview

Die Welt, Germany: Europe Must Step in for the 'Exhausted Empire'

Le Temps, Switzerland: The Danger of America's Diminished Appetite for Intervention Abroad

Rzeczpospolita, Poland: Who Can Replace America as the World's Policeman?

Le Monde, France: Obama and the Return to the Founding Fathers

Global Times, China: The West's Insulting Dismissal of China's Ancient History

La Repubblica, Italy: Game Change: Obama Comes Across as 'Non-Leader'

 

CLICK HERE FOR PORTUGUESE VERSION

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted By Worldmeets.US October 14, 2014, 9:34pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Live Support